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Author: Hagan Osborne

Lover of watching, talking & thinking about movies!

Deserted Island Movie Collection: Cameron Crowe's work from the late 80's to early 2000's is iconic.

Best Movie Snack: I have been known to see movies because of popcorn.

‘Sometimes Always Never’ Review – Mostly Incredibly Sweet

Suppose you had the option in a game of Scrabble to play the word SACCHARINE or ANARCHIC. Saccharine, meaning excessively sweet and sentimental, and anarchic, much to do with lacking control over circumstances, are both worth more than 15 points but also summarise the range of emotions experienced by Bill Nighy and company in the 2019 British drama-comedy, Sometimes Always Never.

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‘The Sisters Brothers’ Review – Why Are So Many Horses Dying in Movies?

From recent releases such as The Rider (2017) and Thoroughbreds (2018), and even as far back as The Godfather (1972), there is an obsession in filmmaking to have horses die to serve metaphoric purposes.

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‘Vox Lux’ Review – Natalie Portman Features in Provocative Pop Opera

It would be remiss of this reviewer to discuss the psychological drama Vox Lux without commenting on the abhorrent manner which pop-star Celeste is endowed by fame; a by-product of a culture obsessed with celebrity in a system that benefits from the exploitation of trauma.

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‘Stan & Ollie’ Review – A Werther’s Original for the Heart

You’d think it’d be a pie in the face for Sony Pictures Classics to release a film about iconic comedy duo Laurel and Hardy without having their stage name in the title but in the case of Stan & Ollie, it speaks a testament to the genius of the pairing both on and away from the spotlight.

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‘At Eternity’s Gate’ – A Stunning but Subdued Portrait of Vincent van Gogh

Russell Crowe won an Academy Award for his role in Gladiator (2000); a spectacle film containing chariot races, battles to the death, and scenes involving Crowe stroking wheat in a field. In a film that promises all the joy of caressing plants without any of the Gladiator action, At Eternity’s Gate enters this year’s award season as a little-known film that could potentially garner Willem Dafoe his first (overdue) Oscar.

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‘Cold Pursuit’ Review – A Gritty Revenge Flick with a Lot of Humour

Despite a catalogue of action films that suffer from sameness, Liam Neeson is an anomaly amongst action greats with his rise to superstardom being celebrated in a way that other legends in the genre (we see you Bruce Willis) are not.

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‘Eighth Grade’ Review: A Genuine Look at Adolescence in a Mobile World

Puberty is a unenjoyable experience for all, and where coming-of-age films have failed to look at teenage-dom through this lens of authenticity, comedian Bo Burnham succeeds in his extremely sincere writing and directorial debut, Eighth Grade.

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‘How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World’ Review

DreamWorks’ How to Train Your Dragon series, which has spanned not only film but books, video games and a TV series, has challenged audiences to look at the damage misguided attitudes can have on society, with all films in the franchise unafraid to highlight the consequences that can occur when dangerous beliefs manifest.

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‘Ralph Breaks the Internet’ – Things Get Out of CTRL for Ralph in New Film

Films which explore internet culture have become increasingly common with two entries already this year, Ready Player One (2018) and Eighth Grade (2018), commenting on how our online behaviours impact offline relationships.

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‘The Favourite’ – A Delightfully Demented Look at Morality in the​ Absence of Civility

Throughout The Favourite, Abigail Hill (Emma Stone) and the Duchess of Marlborough, Lady Sarah Churchill (Rachel Weisz), use the sport of pigeon shooting as a way of delivering cut-throat exchanges towards one another, going as far to fire blanks and splatter animal blood on the other to be imposing.

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